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Category: dataguard

PDBs and role transitions

PDBs and role transitions

Now, we currently do not have per-PDB role transitions. Nevertheless, it is possible to move one PDB to another CDB. However, what if the other CDB is located at the DR site and you don’t want to copy all the data over the network again? Well, this is possible! For this to work, we need 2 CDB’s. One primary in Site A protected by a Standby CDB in Site B. The second CDB is primary in Site B and protected with…

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To CDB or not to CDB, that’s the question

To CDB or not to CDB, that’s the question

A product manager has several parts on the job. You can do outbound PM, that is what you, the readers or public, see. But we have also an inbound task. One of the things we do is answer internal questions and advise on how to use the product. This question is coming from a colleague who is doing an upgrade at a customer and facing some strange things with the move from non-cdb towards a cdb. On My Oracle Support…

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A walkthrough the Transient Logical Standby

A walkthrough the Transient Logical Standby

This blog post is created because I got some questions in the last weeks about upgrading using Data Guard. For migration to the cloud we now have Oracle Move and ZDM ( https://www.oracle.com/database/technologies/cloud-migration.html and https://www.oracle.com/database/technologies/rac/zdm.html) Check them out as well! Data Guard is meant as a Disaster Recovery (DR) solution, but to leverage the usage, one of the things it is often used for is also migrations. My colleague Mike Dietrich ( https://mikedietrichde.com ) can tell you all the differences between upgrade and migration,…

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Is your PDB state saved?

Is your PDB state saved?

This might save you a couple of minutes if you wonder how multitenant works in combination with Oracle Data Guard. The question I got was, is your PDB state saved after a switchover? The short answer is: Yes it is. No statements without proving them of course, so here we go. The primary database: I have the state of my pub always saved in my post creation script, but you can easily retrieve in what state the PDB will be…

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Data Guard made easy

Data Guard made easy

Sometimes I hear stories about struggles to setup Data Guard correctly. It should not be hard. There are lots of ways which lead to a correct setup. Die hards prefer the manual or own scripted way. Other people prefer the point and click method in Enterprise Manager. But one way, which is very easy, and I don’t hear people speaking a lot about it, is using the Database Creation Assistant (dbca).

The Exa-guard project

The Exa-guard project

Ok I cannot name the customer (Approval pending) but a very exciting project just came to an end. You might be aware that I currently have a focus on exadata and high availability and sometimes nice projects come across your way. The title is an invented one, as it was a combination of looooots of exadata stuff and dataguard. And admit, it just sounds cool, isn’t it? 😉 The beginning The initial question was: “Can we expand our X3-2 non-prod…

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Keep it running, can you?

Keep it running, can you?

Recently I had a meeting at a customer with a very nice question. It was a kick-off meeting, but the question was … is it possible to have a system that gives us 99,999 or 99,9999 uptime for our Oracle database. My first reaction was, “But can your stack on top handle these requirements as well?” Apparently they already have this, so now it was time to put this on db-level too. I have to say that the MAA-team does…

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OTN Appreciation Day: Dataguard

OTN Appreciation Day: Dataguard

Thanks Tim Hall for the idea about OTN Appreciation day. The feature I like the most in oracle is a rather “old” one, but it can be extremely useful: Dataguard. Why dataguard? I find it extremely easy to set it up, maintain it and it can save you a lot of “troubles”. Especially on big(ger) databases it takes down the time to recover in case of a failure down to seconds instead of hours. The concept is simple: (image borrowed from the…

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